Thomas K. Szulc, MD (Medical Director of the New York Center for Innovative Medicine) explains the importance of understanding centripetal energy (or in Traditional Chinese Medicine known as Yin energy) and centrifugal energy (Yang energy). Another way of referring to these two energies is as fields of information. These two informational energy fields are management information and resource information. Have a listen:

Proper functioning of any organism is dependant on 2 forces – centripetal energy (or in Traditional Chinese Medicine known as Yin energy) and centrifugal energy (in TCM known as Yang energy). Another way of referring to these two energies is as fields of information. These two informational energy fields are:

  • Management information
    corresponding to Yang centrifugal energy; outward-moving information fields that are of a lower frequency, and related to symptomatic problems within the body.
  • Resource information
    corresponding to Yin centripetal energy; inward moving information fields that are a higher frequency, and related to underlying dysfunctions in the body.
Centripetal Centrifugal Information

Yin, Yang and Computerized Diagnostic Systems

Currently, all computerized medical diagnostic systems can only scan for management information, which represents outward-moving information fields that are of a lower frequency, and related to symptomatic problems within the body. They cannot, however, analyze resource information which represents inward moving information fields that are a higher frequency and related to underlying dysfunctions in the body.

To understand the importance of resource information (centripetal yin energy), let us show a quick example of what happens during analysis with a computerized system.

electrodermal testing limitations

A patient is seated and connected to the computerized medical diagnostic system in any number of forms, and a scan is begun. The amount of information retrieved is dependent on the system as well as the type of scan performed, but regardless some information is relayed to the practitioner. In this instance, the computer system notifies the practitioner that there is a disturbance located in the eye of the patient. The patient may confirm this as they have experienced some discomfort and blurred vision. The computerized system has done its job, and the practitioner may prescribe a medicine or therapy dedicated to improving eye function. But a large piece of critical information is missing.

That the eye is experiencing symptomatic issues is in direct relation to management information – it shows how the body is managing a problem. This is merely a symptom of some deeper underlying dysfunction. The underlying dysfunction may be a localized infection or degenerative process in this case, yet without this information, which is related to resource information, a practitioner is working off limited information to try and treat the dysfunctioning eye.

By accessing both the management and resource information, not only can a practitioner accurately identify that there is an issue in the eye of the patient, but what is causing that problem in the eye. With this information that no current computer can access, personalized treatment is greatly improved and both resolutions of the problem and elimination of the underlying dysfunction can be achieved with greater efficiency.

At the New York Center for Innovative Medicine, Dr. Szulc and the clinical team utilizes numerous advanced evaluation methods, including Bioresonance Analysis of Health, to access both Yin and Yang energies and get a full picture of all pertinent health information as it relates to the patient.

Related: The Limitations of Computerized Medical Diagnostic Systems
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About Thomas Szulc, MD

Thomas K. Szulc, M.D. is the Medical Director at New York Center for Innovative Medicine. He is board certified in anesthesiology and pain medicine, served as Chief of Pain Services at North Shore University Hospital in Plainview, N.Y. for more than a decade, and has been using biological medicine as part of an integrated medical practice since 1985. Previously a visiting professor at Yale University Medical School, Dr. Szulc maintains a role as a professor at the American College of Integrative Medicine and Dentistry. He is the creator of the evaluation system Bioresonance Analysis of Health, and the author of The Art of Medicine.
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  1. […] was being wasted is available to contribute towards health and well-being. Proper management of our resources and management of energy keep us calm and strengthens our defenses, which is vital at this time to manage the symptoms […]

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